Car Culture

Common Reasons for A Dead Battery

July 23, 2017
Car batteries always die at the most inconvenient times. Whether it dies right before you need to leave for work or while you’re on vacation, it’s always a pain. There are several factors that weigh into why your battery might have died. Here are a few of the most common reasons: Human Error Poor driving habits can affect the life of your battery. For instance, not closing your doors all the way, accidentally leaving the headlights or interior lights on, or leaving your trunk open can all contribute to draining the power of your battery. Your car battery needs the chance to rest and recharge, that’s why accidentally leaving a light on in your car overnight can be detrimental to the battery. Most modern cars now have features that alert  you when a light has been left on, or if a door is still open. Pay attention to these alerts and become more conscious of your driving habits to help benefit the life of your battery. Charging Malfunctions If your car’s charging system isn’t functioning properly, your battery could drain even while you’re driving. Your vehicle’s alternator is often the one that powers the lights, radio, and other systems. If the alternator has had an incomplete charge, this can factor into your car battery not being able to accept a full charge, which in turn will not be able to supply enough power to your vehicle. If you notice your car constantly having issues starting, this can be a symptom that your vehicle is having trouble charging. Get this checked out before it turns into a dead battery! Parasitic Drain This occurs when a discharge of power continues to occur after your engine is shut off. However, some parasitic drain is normal. Your battery is built to keep components like your radio presets, clock, and security features operating at all times, but if other components in your vehicle continue to run after the engine has been turned off, the parasitic drain can exceed what’s normal and lead to draining the battery. Your Battery Is Old It is possible that your battery has died simply because it has lived its life. The typical car battery can last around 2 – 6 years, depending on your driving habits, vehicle make and model, etc. If your battery is old, it will start to not hold a full charge, and ultimately just wear out. If you’ve had your battery around five years and you start to notice a slow engine crank, it might be time for a new battery. If you’re experiencing issues starting your engine, a low battery fluid level, a battery leak, or issues with your lights turning on, these are all symptoms that your battery might be on its last leg. A good rule of thumb is to have your battery checked yearly to catch any problems that might occur before you run into trouble.

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